William J. Ripple

Dept. of Forest Ecosystems & Society OREGON STATE UNIVERSITY

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William J. Ripple is a Distinguished Professor of Ecology, best known for his research on terrestrial trophic cascades, particularly the role of the gray wolf  in North America as an apex predator and a keystone species that shapes food webs and landscape structures via “top-down” pressures. Ripple heads the Trophic Cascades Program at Oregon State University, which carries out several research initiatives such as the Aspen Project, the Wolves in Nature Project, and the Range Contractions Project.

Selected publications

Ripple W.J., Wolf C., Newsome T.M., Betts M.G., Ceballos G., Courchamp F., Hayward M.W., Van Valkenburgh B., Wallach A.D., Worm B. 2019. Are we eating the world's megafauna to extinction? Conservation Letters. 2019 e12627. 

Beschta R.L., Ripple W.J. 2019. Can large carnivores change streams via a trophic cascade? Ecohydrology. 12(1):e2048.

Dellinger J.A., Shores C.R., Craig A., Heithaus M.R., Ripple W.J., Wirsing A.J. 2019. Habitat use of sympatric prey suggests divergent anti‑predator responses to recolonizing gray wolves. Oecologia.

Ripple W.J., Miller S.D., Schoen J.W., Rabinowitch S.P.. 2019. Large carnivores under assault in Alaska. PLoS Biol. 17(1):e3000090.

Painter L.E., Beschta R.L., Larsen E.J., Ripple W.J.. 2018. Aspen recruitment in the Yellowstone region linked to reduced herbivory after large carnivore restoration. Ecosphere. 9(8):e02376.

Ripple W.J., Wolf C., Newsome T.M., Hoffmann M., Wirsing A.J., McCauley D.J.. 2018. Both the largest and smallest vertebrates have elevated extinction risk. PNAS. 115(26):E5847-E5848.

van Eeden LM, Eklund A, Miller J.R.B., Lopez-Bao J.V., Chapron G., Cejtin M.R., Crowther M.S., Dickman C.R., Frank J., Krofel M et al.. 2018. Carnivore conservation needs evidence based livestock protection. PLoS Biol. 16(9):e2005577.

Dellinger J.A., Shores C.R., Marsh M., Heithaus M.R., Ripple W.J., Wirsing A.J.. 2018. Impacts of recolonizing gray wolves (Canis lupus) on survival and mortality in two sympatric ungulates. Can. J. Zool.. 96:760–768.

Lundgren E.J., Ramp D., Ripple W.J., Wallach A.D.. 2018. Introduced megafauna are rewilding the Anthropocene. Ecography. 41(6):857-866.

Wallach A.D., Lundgren E.J., Ripple W.J., Ramp D.. 2018. Invisible megafauna. Conservation Biology.

Wolf C., Betts M.G., Levi T., Newsome T.M., Ripple W.J.. 2018. Large species within carnivora are large carnivores. Royal Society Open Science. 5:181228.

van Eeden LM, Crowther M.S., Dickman C.R., Macdonald D.W., Ripple W.J., Ritchie E.G., Newsome T.M.. 2018. Managing conflict between large carnivores and livestock. Conservation Biology. 32(1):26-34.

Peters R., et al. 2018. Nature Divided, Scientists United: US–Mexico Border Wall Threatens Biodiversity and Binational Conservation. Bioscience.

Courchamp F., Jaric I., Albert C, Meinard Y., Ripple W.J., Chapron G.. 2018. The paradoxical extinction of the most charismatic animals. PLoS Biol. 16(4):e2003997.

Ripple W.J., Wolf C., Galetti M., Newsome T.M., Green T.L., Alamgir M, Crist E, Mahmoud M.I., Laurance W.F.. 2018. The Role of Scientists’ Warning in Shifting Policy from Growth to Conservation Economy. Bioscience. 68(4):239-240.

Ripple W.J., Meijaard E., Newsome T.M.. 2018. Saving the World with Satire: A Response to Chapron et al.. Trends in Ecology & Evolution. 33(7):483-484.

Shackelford N, Standish R.J., Ripple W.J., Starzomski B.M.. 2018. Threats to biodiversity from cumulative human impacts in one of North America's last wildlife frontiers. Conservation Biology. 32(3):672-684.

Beschta R.L., Painter L.E., Ripple W.J.. 2018. Trophic cascades at multiple spatial scales shape recovery of young aspen in Yellowstone. Forest Ecology and Management. 413:62-69.

Gray T.N.E., Hughes A.C., Laurance W.F., Long B., Lynam A.J., O'Kelly H., Ripple W.J., Seng T., Scotson L., Wilkinson N.M.. 2018. The wildlife snaring crisis: an insidious and pervasive threat to biodiversity in Southeast Asia. Biodivers Conserv. 27:1031–1037.

Beschta R.L., Ripple W.J.. 2018. Wolf-triggered trophic cascades and stream channel dynamics in Olympic National Park: a comment on East et al.. Earth Surf. Process. Landforms.